How British private schools are dealing with China’s “crackdown”

In the early 2000s, British private schools began setting up shop in China, eager to leverage their reputation for excellence in exchange for the opportunity to add to their bottom line by educating the children of one of the world’s fastest-growing and most affluent middle classes. In China, British independent schools—private schools with sister campuses in the UK—operate under two different … http://bit.ly/2vCRFfk

Watch! Shanghai’s retirement communities model a future for China’s Boomers

Who is considered old? The UN defines an older person as anyone over 60. In 2017, the global population aged 60 and older is growing faster than all younger groups. Countries everywhere are getting older. But the speed and scope of China’s population aging is unprecedented, exacerbated by decades of its one-child policy. By 2030, China will have almost 500 million people … http://bit.ly/2RVSBRK

Tesla built its largest Supercharger station in China—for the third time

If you want to assess the state of electric vehicles in the world, just look at where Tesla is building its biggest Supercharger stations. Tesla debuted in China, the world’s most vibrant electric vehicle market, in 2014. Despite competing against cut-rate homegrown models and premium options (as well as a 25% import tax on Tesla’s products), the carmaker has made fast in- … http://bit.ly/2BHFShg

China’s central bank believes bitcoin will die

China once dominated the bitcoin markets, accounting for over 90% of global trading. But in September, its central bank banned initial coin offerings (ICOs) and stopped cryptocurrency exchanges from serving local customers. Looking back at the crackdowns, Pan Gongsheng, a deputy governor of the People’s Bank of China, believes Beijing made the right decisions. Speaking at … http://bit.ly/2AnKojA

Confucius Institutes across Africa are nurturing generations of pro-China Mandarin speakers

Ten Zambian women sit in a row, readjusting hairdos and smoothing skirts in a flutter of nerves. Another young woman is in tears on the manicured lawn of Lusaka’s Chinese embassy, with a number 1 pinned to her prom-style dress. This isn’t a beauty pageant. It’s a Mandarin proficiency contest hosted by Hanban, the state-run Chinese organization that is driving the largest … http://bit.ly/2zwAwUc